FEATURED STORY


Owner Gene Weymouth went to Penn National's winner's circle with trainer Janet Elliot and jockey Bernie Dalton after Wild for Gold scored his maiden victory in 2011. (Penn National photo)

Eugene E. Weymouth, a steeplechase horseman whose racing career spanned eight decades, died Monday, June 11, after being in failing health for several years. He was 85.

The son of steeplechase owner George Tyler Weymouth, Gene was the namesake of his grandfather, Eugene Eleuthere duPont. His late younger brother, George “Frolic” Weymouth, was the founder of the Brandywine Conservancy.

Gene Weymouth graduated from the McDonogh School and attended the University of Wisconsin’s School of Agriculture and the University of Delaware, but his passion was horses, and specifically steeplechase horses.

Beginning in the 1940s, he rode, trained, and owned jump horses. At 6-foot-3, most hurdle races were out of the question, so he specialized in riding timber horses. He rode England’s Grand National in 1949 aboard Possible and fell at one of its towering fences.

He enjoyed success in most American timber races, including a victory in the 1957 Maryland Hunt Cup with Ned’s Flying, a $50 purchase as a two-year-old. Sports Illustrated reported that year that Weymouth had promised his father he would quit riding if he ever won the Hunt Cup, but he soon reneged on that promise and rode Another Hyacinth to victory in the Iroquois Steeplechase two weeks later.

He transitioned into training from his Chester County, Pa., base in the 1960s and maintained a stable of flat and hurdle horses through the remainder of the century. He was one of the original purchasers of a condominium Fair Hill Training Center barn in the mid-1980s. As a trainer, his final National Steeplechase Association start was in 2000.

In recent years, he has raced horses with Hall of Fame trainer Janet Elliot, and his Wild for Gold won in 2011 and 2012.

Funeral services will be private.

FEATURED VIDEO

NEED TO KNOW

RECENT NEWS

VIEW ALL -
  • in News

    STEEPLECHASE ENTHUSIAST BILL TETER DIES

    William “Bill” Teter, a longtime steeplechase enthusiast who was an occasional horse owner and racing official, died Thursday, June 14, while surrounded by his family at his home in Parkesburg, Pa. He was 83. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Jane Oas Teter. Among his survivors are son Jeffrey Teter, a three-time...
  • in News

    SPRING PURSES ESTABLISH NSA RECORD

    The National Steeplechase Association concluded its 2018 spring season with record purses of $2,833,800, an increase of 7.2% and more than $140,000 over the prior record set in 2017. For the first time, the NSA season featured two Grade 1 races, the $150,000 Marion duPont Scott Colonial Cup at the Carolina Cup Races, and the $200,000 Calvin Houg...
  • in News

    DAWN WALL SURGES TO COGGINS MEMORIAL UPSET

    In a victory for family connections, The Fields Stable’s lightly regarded Dawn Wall charged through the homestretch on Saturday to claim a half-length victory in the $50,000 Iris Ann Coggins Memorial Stakes, the featured race of the 84th annual Fair Hill Races. Check Mark Stables’ Willow U appeared to be in a winning position after the final fen...
  • in News

    NSA SOLICITS BIDS FOR VIDEO SERVICES

    The National Steeplechase Association is soliciting proposals to provide high-definition video services for all of its race meets, with an initial one-year contract period extending from this coming fall through next spring. The video services primarily will serve the stewards at approximately 30 race meets and will provide photo-finish capabilitie...

CHASING IN FOCUS

Dawn Wall takes final stake of season: Mutasaawy makes a comeback, and a couple of promising maidens emerge

After 16 race meets in eight states over two action-pack months, the NSA Spring season came to a close on May 26 with a nine-race parimutuel card on the home course in sweltering Fair Hill, Md. And in the featured $50,000 Iris Coggins Memorial filly & mare stakes, 18-1 Dawn Wall pulled a major upset over favored For Goodness Sake and Willow U for The Fields Stable, trainer Elizabeth Voss, and jockey Jack Doyle. Going into the summer season Doyle leads all riders in wins and earnings. It was also a big day for owner Gill Johnston, who took two, the $40,000 Valentine Memorial ratings handicap with a resurgent Mutasaawy (trained by Neil Morris and ridden by Michael Mitchell), and $30,000 Sport of Kings maiden with Set To Music (Kathy Neilson and Mitchell again). In the second division of the Sport of Kings, Northwoods Stable and Sheila Williams' Notjudginjustsayin won over hurdles at first asking for Jack Fisher and Sean McDermott. Tod Marks has the photo recap.

Click here for more slide shows.

SOME FACTS ABOUT JUMP RACING IN NORTH AMERICA

$6,140,000

NSA PURSES IN 2016

498 HORSES

RAN IN 2016

+1,000,000

SPECTATORS EACH YEAR

12 STATES

HOST STEEPLECHASE RACES
TOP